Tuesday, March 18, 2008

Warmups.

Four weeks of a boot and two weeks of a brace later, and I'm pain free. Doctor says that I'll be fine reffing at camp at the end of May.

"Just be sure to warm up. Maybe run around the court before the game begins."

Um...doctor? They don't let us do that. It would be freakin' ideal if we had our own hoop just off to the side where we could run layup lines while the players do...a few practice thrusts of our fists into the air...but there isn't.

He suggested some squat-thrusts in the locker room. Again, doubtful. Most of the ref rooms 'round here are literally closet-sized.

So I go to my readership (all three of you). How the hell can a ref get a decent warmup? And even if I can, will it go away while I stand like a post by the side of the road for 17 minutes before tipoff? I guess I could pop up onto my tiptoes every 30 seconds or so to keep the ankles fresh, but would that be enough?

I'll be getting a personal trainer sometime in the next two weeks who might answer all this for me, but what do you do?

6 Comments:

At 7:02 PM, Blogger tommyspoon said...

Besides complain loudly and fiercely to whoever is in charge that the policy is idiotic, not to mention unhealthy?

Jogging in place isn't bad. Neither are a set or two of jumping jacks. (Seriously.)

If it were me, this is what I would do:

1. Get to the venue 15-30 minutes prior to my "call time".

2. Park on the far side of the lot.

3. Take off your coat and run a few wind-sprints of about ten or fifteen car-widths.

4. Stretch out your calves and thighs and hamstrings afterwards.

5. Grab your stuff and lightly jog into the venue.

6. Dress out.

7. Do the following while awaiting to take to the court: touch your toes, side stretches, shoulder shrugs, even a few pushups.

8. Go ref like a muthafucker.

9. Hydrate or die!

 
At 8:07 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I see officials jog back and forth on the end line while watching the players. Just can't do that if your the R in a 3 man game. I would suggest trying that if you can.

I do like the idea above about parking far away though.

-young ref

 
At 11:33 AM, Anonymous massref said...

Most of the time, what I see is guys jogging (occasionally sprinting) the length of the court 3-5 minutes before we go to greet the coaches.

I don't do it. I don't think it looks particularly good. But if you HAVE to do it, then you have to do it. It's your last chance to stretch it a bit before really pushing it.

And I've seen the R in a 3-whistle game do it. So I wouldn't worry about that. :-)

 
At 10:35 AM, Blogger tommyspoon said...

I don't do it. I don't think it looks particularly good.

Maybe I'm missing something, but is the sight of refs warming up somehow offensive? And is that a sufficient reason not to prepare to engage in a physical activity?

I'm not a ref, but speaking as someone who does engage in a grueling physical activity (acting), I find warming up absolutely essential to my performance (pun intended).

 
At 9:10 AM, Anonymous massref said...

is the sight of refs warming up somehow offensive?

It's not offensive, but some people consider it unprofessional. I just think it doesn't look good for the officials to be running the sideline before the game. Why? I don't know that I can put an exact reason on it. It just looks like you're not ready, you're not focused.

The problem, of course, is that for an NCAA men's game, you have to be on the floor 30 minutes before tip. Which means that even if you stretch in the locker room, you may start to tighten up by game time.

That's why I said if you have to do it, then you have to do it. But I don't do it, and I think it can give a bad first impression to coaches who are already looking for a reason to complain.

 
At 10:59 AM, Blogger tommyspoon said...

Why? I don't know that I can put an exact reason on it. It just looks like you're not ready, you're not focused.

I guess I can understand that you don't want to give the coaches any fodder for future disputes. But I think the opposite is true: warming up demonstrates professionalism. You care enough about the game to prepare yourself physically as well as mentally.

 

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